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Drilling holes in the roof of a 1996 Civic coupe

  #1  
Old 04-25-2009, 10:15 AM
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Default Drilling holes in the roof of a 1996 Civic coupe

I want to install Yakima Landing Pads on the roof of my 1996 Civic DX coupe. For cars that don't have factory installed roof rails (or custom rails for that matter), the Landing Pads require drilling two holes in the roof for each of the four pads. The two holes for the pair of front pads are drilled about 5 and 9 inches back from the front of the roof and about 2 inches in from the side. The rear pads are about 32 inches behind the front pair.

There are two types of Landing Pads to consider for this type of installation. For #6 Landing pads you have to remove the headliner.The holes are 1/4". A large nut secures the pads on the inside of the roof. For #7 Landing Pads you do not have to remove the headliner, the holes are 25/64", and a proprietary molybolt kind of fastener secures the pad. Obviously, if you remove the headliner you can anticipate any obstructions, but the installation is easier if you don't have to remove the headliner (and there are no obstructions).

My question is, does anyone know if there are roof supports or wires in the four areas I need to install the pads? Thanks.

Photo of Landing Pad #6 parts here.
 
  #2  
Old 04-25-2009, 10:54 AM
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i wouldnt drill any holes in the roof!!!!!!!!! ive seen some roof racks that dont have to drill into the roof and thats the style i would stick with!
but if you want to, then just pull the headliner out. its very easy to pull!
 
  #3  
Old 04-26-2009, 12:59 AM
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Thanks for the info that pulling the headliner is relatively simple. I've read about it here, but wasn't sure how long it would take to remove and reinstall. Someone said the sun visor clips were a hassle. If I have to take it off anyway, maybe I should change the fabric to something with more visual appeal.

There are good reasons why one would want to permanently install Yakima Landing Pads (or the more versatile Tracks), especially on a coupe. For clamp-on racks on a coupe the distance between the cross bars is too short to carry larger items unless you get a stretch kit, which adds cost. Also the Control Towers, crossbars, and sport specific carriers detach as a unit and remount very easily from the Landing Pads, so it is easy to store your rack in the garage when you don't need it. There are some reports of clip-on racks that have blown off during use.
 
  #4  
Old 04-26-2009, 02:18 AM
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They make some really nice clip on roof racks. I highly recommend you rethink this.

 

Last edited by trustdestruction; 04-26-2009 at 02:22 AM.
  #5  
Old 04-26-2009, 07:02 AM
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well ive heard of alot of stuff blowing off as well BUT that does not mean the product is crap.... could easily be user error with them not instaling it properly or not tight enough...
ive seen plenty of those roof storage things blown off but ive seen a bunch of them also not tied down properly and visually moving!
but if you want to drill a hole go ahead just remember that hole wont go anywhere. so you better get used to it after you drill it.
 
  #6  
Old 04-26-2009, 08:35 AM
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Putting holes in the roof is too permanent. It will hurt you when you try to re-sell unless you happen to find someone needing a rack.
 
  #7  
Old 04-26-2009, 10:49 PM
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I appreciate the warnings, I really do. I have thought about this off and on for over a year. Further, I've used a Yakima clip-on rack for the past 15 years on a Camry sedan so I am familiar with them. In addition, lot's of cars have factory installed roof channels (or tracks) and they perform well. That said, no one has addressed my question of possible obstructions, such as support members in the roof. Has anyone had the headliner of a 1996 Civic coupe off and remember what the roof looked like from underneath? Thanks.
 
  #8  
Old 04-27-2009, 02:30 AM
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ive had mine out but i didnt memorize the bracing and wires... just pull yours and know where everything is before you drill any holes!
 
  #9  
Old 04-27-2009, 11:55 AM
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Originally Posted by addiction2bass View Post
ive had mine out but i didnt memorize the bracing and wires... just pull yours and know where everything is before you drill any holes!
Good, sound advice. That's what I'll do.
 
  #10  
Old 04-27-2009, 12:50 PM
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please dont take it to me acting like a d***. but its just awhole lot easier.
this might help ya with removing the headliner.. and if you want to go ahead and recover it also.
https://www.hondacivicforum.com/foru...ad.php?t=69903
 

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